Parcours


As far back as he can remember, this artist-painter form Lille, born in 1966, has neither thrown up his pencils nor his brush.

Early in the 1980's, persuaded by a deep need of expression, he first turned to acting (at the National Superior Academy of Drama) before devoting definitely to painting.

In 1988, he settled in Paris before abandoning the capital in 1989 for Florida where he became a portrait painter for the Walt Disney company. Back to Paris in 1990, he began a long period of apprenticeship through different works (paintings, sceneries, frescos, happenings at parties, posters, magazines' cover, sculptures...). Thus for many companies such as Nokia, Médiascenie, Bouygues, Baccarat, Canon and especially for Louis Vuitton with which he has collaborated on regular occasions for more than five years.

In 1997, he decided to no longer devote himself to his painting merely and thus abandoned all the 'food' work which monopolized too much of his time, preventing him from giving free expression to his own creation. He was quite convinced of the fact that it is not up to the artist, not necessarily business-minded, to defend his word facing art galleries, but indeed for art traders to unearth the painter's undertakings. Considering that idea, he still organizes his exhibitions himself thus allowing genuine freedom but admittedly requiring much time and vigour. In very different places, from his own studio in Montreuil, which was an abandoned 1600 m² factory, to Glaz'art (a Cultural Parisian Place), or many companies or hotels like “l'Alliance” at Lille, a magnificent Minimes' seventeenth century convent, which he uses to show his work. Organizing exhibitions is a vital need for this painter. It is like giving birth, the artist bringing forth to his work which takes shape once out of his studio... To be life-like, a masterpiece has to be displayed... To be full of sense, the painting must rouse more sensitivities than the painter's own. And all that, because the artist, himself is a simple means of expression to this emotion. He does not personally appreciate its quality but the skilful mixture produced by his inspiration, by his gnuineness and self denial. If he seems to be such a demonstrative artist, it is undoubtedly because he paints instead of being talkative. He uses colours and substance where words only are not adequate. His free inspiration is doubtless the expression which best characterizes his work. His need of standing up for these feelings makes him compulsive. Once inspired, he sets out on “painting-marathons” of at least several weeks or several months without any breaks. Thus his painting themes are as various as his style (like acrylic, oil painting, collage, watercolour, press flat, substance...). Sometimes one wonders why so much difference between his topics. For an answer, he replies :

'That is explained by the fact that my tastes, my wishes and my mood are numerous. I cannot confine myself to one simple subject when many new ideas jostle each other in my mind. I am like a compulsive eater when I find myself in a creative wave. Even when I am working on a painting, and another subject comes up, I do not hesitate to fling it over a canvas to not let it run away, before focusing again on the former painting. Sometimes I may be working on ten odd pictures at the same time but on quite varied topics.'

To sum up his art, he carries on saying :

'My work consists of respecting an only and unique aim of being as sincere and genuine as possible, staying tuned in my inspiration and in the painting which often suggests me the way. Most of the time when I start on a canvas, the only intention, the general work spirit is the real driving force behind it. I do not really imagine what the painting would represent once it is finished, but the most important is being convinced of what it will bring out. My painting guides me by the stroke of the paintbrush. I do not necessarily have an exact schedule.'